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Pea Seeds

(14 items)

Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excellent stir fry ingredient.

Peas can be planted straight out into the ground in the early spring as they benefit from a cool period at the start of their lives. It is possible to sow in pots during the autumn and over winter and whilst this may. . . Show More >

Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excellent stir fry ingredient.

Peas can be planted straight out into the ground in the early spring as they benefit from a cool period at the start of their lives. It is possible to sow in pots during the autumn and over winter and whilst this may produce stronger plants, they will require more time and space. Some gardeners like to soak their pea seeds before sowing to soften their tough coat. It is also feasible to sow in modules and transplant – this may protect them from mice and other hungry critters – but our advice would be to keep a few back that have been grown in pots. Peas need support as they like to ramble and cascade over things. You can use netting, trellis, canes or even old spindly branches! Plant your crops each side of the support, or alternatively add the support later once the plants have started producing tendrils. Watering is important when plants are flowering as this helps the pods to form and a good mulch can also help here. A quick tip is to sow your seeds a little thicker than usual so they can be thinned out. You can also use the pea shoots in salads or sandwiches!


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Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excel. . . Show More >

Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excellent stir fry ingredient.

Peas can be planted straight out into the ground in the early spring as they benefit from a cool period at the start of their lives. It is possible to sow in pots during the autumn and over winter and whilst this may produce stronger plants, they will require more time and space. Some gardeners like to soak their pea seeds before sowing to soften their tough coat. It is also feasible to sow in modules and transplant – this may protect them from mice and other hungry critters – but our advice would be to keep a few back that have been grown in pots. Peas need support as they like to ramble and cascade over things. You can use netting, trellis, canes or even old spindly branches! Plant your crops each side of the support, or alternatively add the support later once the plants have started producing tendrils. Watering is important when plants are flowering as this helps the pods to form and a good mulch can also help here. A quick tip is to sow your seeds a little thicker than usual so they can be thinned out. You can also use the pea shoots in salads or sandwiches!


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Pea - Champion of England Pea Seeds - Champion of England

Average Seeds 100

£3.50
Pea Ambassador Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Ambassador

Average Packet Content 200 seeds

£2.79
Pea Blauschokker Pea Seeds - Blauwschokker

Average Seeds 100

£2.50
Pea Herald Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Herald (Heraut)

Average Packet Content 125 seeds

£2.49
Pea Karina Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Karina

Average Packet Content 300 seeds

£2.49
Pea Kelvedon Wonder Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Kelvedon Wonder

Average Packet Content 200 seeds

£1.99
Pea Oregon Sugar Pod Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Oregon Sugar Pod

Average Packet Content 200 seeds

£1.99
Pea Progress No 9 Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Progress No. 9

Average Packet Content 150 seeds

£2.99
Pea Seeds - Hurst Greenshaft Pea Seeds - Hurst Greenshaft

Average Seeds 400

£1.99
Pea Shoots Seeds - Twinkle Pea Shoots Seeds - Twinkle

Average seeds 200

£2.99
Pea Sugar Norli Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Norli Sugar Pea

Average Packet Content 200 seeds

£2.49
Pea Sweet Horizon Organic Pea (Organic) Seeds - Sweet Horizon

Average Packet Content 125 seeds

£2.49
  • You're on page 1

Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excellent stir fry ingredient.

Peas can be planted straight out into the ground in the early spring as they benefit from a cool period at the start of their lives. It is possible to sow in pots during the autumn and over winter and whilst this may produce stronger plants, they will require more time and space. Some gardeners like to soak their pea seeds before sowing to soften their tough coat. It is also feasible to sow in modules and transplant – this may protect them from mice and other hungry critters – but our advice would be to keep a few back that have been grown in pots. Peas need support as they like to ramble and cascade over things. You can use netting, trellis, canes or even old spindly branches! Plant your crops each side of the support, or alternatively add the support later once the plants have started producing tendrils. Watering is important when plants are flowering as this helps the pods to form and a good mulch can also help here. A quick tip is to sow your seeds a little thicker than usual so they can be thinned out. You can also use the pea shoots in salads or sandwiches!

Hardy pea varieties are perfect for sowing in the autumn for an early crop, others are perfect for containers and some will even withstand a light frost. Varieties also stretch to semi-leafless for easy picking and mildew-resistant plants. All, however, have a wonderfully sweet taste when freshly picked and the mangetouts make for an excellent stir fry ingredient.

Peas can be planted straight out into the ground in the early spring as they benefit from a cool period at the start of their lives. It is possible to sow in pots during the autumn and over winter and whilst this may produce stronger plants, they will require more time and space. Some gardeners like to soak their pea seeds before sowing to soften their tough coat. It is also feasible to sow in modules and transplant – this may protect them from mice and other hungry critters – but our advice would be to keep a few back that have been grown in pots. Peas need support as they like to ramble and cascade over things. You can use netting, trellis, canes or even old spindly branches! Plant your crops each side of the support, or alternatively add the support later once the plants have started producing tendrils. Watering is important when plants are flowering as this helps the pods to form and a good mulch can also help here. A quick tip is to sow your seeds a little thicker than usual so they can be thinned out. You can also use the pea shoots in salads or sandwiches!

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