Shallots

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With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addition to your home cooking!

Organic matter such as worm-cast plus a few comfrey pellets or some slow-release fertiliser will help your shallots establish, as they’re hungry plants who prefer loose soil. Plant your organic shallot bulbs so. . . Show More >

With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addition to your home cooking!

Organic matter such as worm-cast plus a few comfrey pellets or some slow-release fertiliser will help your shallots establish, as they’re hungry plants who prefer loose soil. Plant your organic shallot bulbs so that the tip is showing, and, unlike onions, there is no need to lime. We recommend planting autumn to early spring, with spring being better for cooler climates. A thin mulch or worm-cast during the growing season is good practice. Shallots are also perfect for the space-limited gardener, as they’re happy to grow in containers and even the leaves can be clipped to garnish your meals.


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With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addit. . . Show More >

With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addition to your home cooking!

Organic matter such as worm-cast plus a few comfrey pellets or some slow-release fertiliser will help your shallots establish, as they’re hungry plants who prefer loose soil. Plant your organic shallot bulbs so that the tip is showing, and, unlike onions, there is no need to lime. We recommend planting autumn to early spring, with spring being better for cooler climates. A thin mulch or worm-cast during the growing season is good practice. Shallots are also perfect for the space-limited gardener, as they’re happy to grow in containers and even the leaves can be clipped to garnish your meals.


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With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addition to your home cooking!

Organic matter such as worm-cast plus a few comfrey pellets or some slow-release fertiliser will help your shallots establish, as they’re hungry plants who prefer loose soil. Plant your organic shallot bulbs so that the tip is showing, and, unlike onions, there is no need to lime. We recommend planting autumn to early spring, with spring being better for cooler climates. A thin mulch or worm-cast during the growing season is good practice. Shallots are also perfect for the space-limited gardener, as they’re happy to grow in containers and even the leaves can be clipped to garnish your meals.

With a similar makeup to onions, shallots are superb in salads or Asian stir fries and are sometimes referred to as the “rich man’s onion”. There are plenty of varieties to choose from, some with high-yielding and mildew resistant qualities. Better yet, these bulbs are certified as virus free and will be a delicious addition to your home cooking!

Organic matter such as worm-cast plus a few comfrey pellets or some slow-release fertiliser will help your shallots establish, as they’re hungry plants who prefer loose soil. Plant your organic shallot bulbs so that the tip is showing, and, unlike onions, there is no need to lime. We recommend planting autumn to early spring, with spring being better for cooler climates. A thin mulch or worm-cast during the growing season is good practice. Shallots are also perfect for the space-limited gardener, as they’re happy to grow in containers and even the leaves can be clipped to garnish your meals.

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