Aubergine Plants

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From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. Those flowers will also naturally reduce your weeding and watering.

Start your plants in a propagator during spring and plant out after the frosts have passed. As with all tender crops, beware radiation frosts – these are caused by cold. . . Show More >

From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. Those flowers will also naturally reduce your weeding and watering.

Start your plants in a propagator during spring and plant out after the frosts have passed. As with all tender crops, beware radiation frosts – these are caused by cold nights, so if one is due, remember to protect your aubergines. To ‘harden off’ is a good policy: in mid-spring, put the plants outside, but bring them in to a warmer area for the nights, gradually acclimatising them. You can also warm up the soil in advance with fleece or organic mulch. Sprinkle a few comfrey pellets mixed with an organic mulch when planting, and switch to a high-potash liquid feed as the season progresses to encourage fruit and flowers. Pinch out the plants tips as they grow, which encourages them to become bushy and add a few support canes where necessary. Aubergines need the bees, so consider planting with pollinator-attracting plants such as borage.


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From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. . . . Show More >

From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. Those flowers will also naturally reduce your weeding and watering.

Start your plants in a propagator during spring and plant out after the frosts have passed. As with all tender crops, beware radiation frosts – these are caused by cold nights, so if one is due, remember to protect your aubergines. To ‘harden off’ is a good policy: in mid-spring, put the plants outside, but bring them in to a warmer area for the nights, gradually acclimatising them. You can also warm up the soil in advance with fleece or organic mulch. Sprinkle a few comfrey pellets mixed with an organic mulch when planting, and switch to a high-potash liquid feed as the season progresses to encourage fruit and flowers. Pinch out the plants tips as they grow, which encourages them to become bushy and add a few support canes where necessary. Aubergines need the bees, so consider planting with pollinator-attracting plants such as borage.


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From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. Those flowers will also naturally reduce your weeding and watering.

Start your plants in a propagator during spring and plant out after the frosts have passed. As with all tender crops, beware radiation frosts – these are caused by cold nights, so if one is due, remember to protect your aubergines. To ‘harden off’ is a good policy: in mid-spring, put the plants outside, but bring them in to a warmer area for the nights, gradually acclimatising them. You can also warm up the soil in advance with fleece or organic mulch. Sprinkle a few comfrey pellets mixed with an organic mulch when planting, and switch to a high-potash liquid feed as the season progresses to encourage fruit and flowers. Pinch out the plants tips as they grow, which encourages them to become bushy and add a few support canes where necessary. Aubergines need the bees, so consider planting with pollinator-attracting plants such as borage.

From oval, to elongated, to varieties with meaty flesh and a low seed count, aubergine plants have become more and more popular in recent years. Delicious in stir fries, soups, or stuffed with goodies and baked! Aubergines are beautiful plants, with their deep purple or intense white variants, and look wonderful when planted with flowers. Those flowers will also naturally reduce your weeding and watering.

Start your plants in a propagator during spring and plant out after the frosts have passed. As with all tender crops, beware radiation frosts – these are caused by cold nights, so if one is due, remember to protect your aubergines. To ‘harden off’ is a good policy: in mid-spring, put the plants outside, but bring them in to a warmer area for the nights, gradually acclimatising them. You can also warm up the soil in advance with fleece or organic mulch. Sprinkle a few comfrey pellets mixed with an organic mulch when planting, and switch to a high-potash liquid feed as the season progresses to encourage fruit and flowers. Pinch out the plants tips as they grow, which encourages them to become bushy and add a few support canes where necessary. Aubergines need the bees, so consider planting with pollinator-attracting plants such as borage.

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