Rhubarb Crowns

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Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties provide a robust, unfussy plant that can last for years. The stems also come in an array of wonderful colours, from yellowy green to a beautiful dark red.

Choose a sunny, free draining spot and plant with the crown just below the surface. The. . . Show More >

Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties provide a robust, unfussy plant that can last for years. The stems also come in an array of wonderful colours, from yellowy green to a beautiful dark red.

Choose a sunny, free draining spot and plant with the crown just below the surface. They will enjoy buckets of organic matter and it's a good idea to allow it a year or so to establish. Rhubarb is a perennial plant so is a permanent fixture in your garden. We recommend removing leaves when they die to prevent rotting of the crown (don’t forget to add them to the compost bin!). Rhubarb is a fairly undemanding plant, producing a crop that should not be anything other than organic. It’s also happy to grow in semi-shade, thus maximising space. Although it is a bit of a shame, it's a good idea to remove the flowers as you want the plant to concentrate on producing those lovely pink leaf stalks. Some growers like to exclude light, which encourages the plant to produce tender leaves; this is known in the rhubarb game as ‘blanching’.


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Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties . . . Show More >

Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties provide a robust, unfussy plant that can last for years. The stems also come in an array of wonderful colours, from yellowy green to a beautiful dark red.

Choose a sunny, free draining spot and plant with the crown just below the surface. They will enjoy buckets of organic matter and it's a good idea to allow it a year or so to establish. Rhubarb is a perennial plant so is a permanent fixture in your garden. We recommend removing leaves when they die to prevent rotting of the crown (don’t forget to add them to the compost bin!). Rhubarb is a fairly undemanding plant, producing a crop that should not be anything other than organic. It’s also happy to grow in semi-shade, thus maximising space. Although it is a bit of a shame, it's a good idea to remove the flowers as you want the plant to concentrate on producing those lovely pink leaf stalks. Some growers like to exclude light, which encourages the plant to produce tender leaves; this is known in the rhubarb game as ‘blanching’.


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Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties provide a robust, unfussy plant that can last for years. The stems also come in an array of wonderful colours, from yellowy green to a beautiful dark red.

Choose a sunny, free draining spot and plant with the crown just below the surface. They will enjoy buckets of organic matter and it's a good idea to allow it a year or so to establish. Rhubarb is a perennial plant so is a permanent fixture in your garden. We recommend removing leaves when they die to prevent rotting of the crown (don’t forget to add them to the compost bin!). Rhubarb is a fairly undemanding plant, producing a crop that should not be anything other than organic. It’s also happy to grow in semi-shade, thus maximising space. Although it is a bit of a shame, it's a good idea to remove the flowers as you want the plant to concentrate on producing those lovely pink leaf stalks. Some growers like to exclude light, which encourages the plant to produce tender leaves; this is known in the rhubarb game as ‘blanching’.

Rhubarb is packed with minerals, contains fibre that is good for digestion and is abundant in both vitamins B and C. It’s fair to say no veg plot or edible growing space is complete without rhubarb. These plants have a wonderful tart taste, and some will produce stems for cropping from spring until autumn. Old kitchen varieties provide a robust, unfussy plant that can last for years. The stems also come in an array of wonderful colours, from yellowy green to a beautiful dark red.

Choose a sunny, free draining spot and plant with the crown just below the surface. They will enjoy buckets of organic matter and it's a good idea to allow it a year or so to establish. Rhubarb is a perennial plant so is a permanent fixture in your garden. We recommend removing leaves when they die to prevent rotting of the crown (don’t forget to add them to the compost bin!). Rhubarb is a fairly undemanding plant, producing a crop that should not be anything other than organic. It’s also happy to grow in semi-shade, thus maximising space. Although it is a bit of a shame, it's a good idea to remove the flowers as you want the plant to concentrate on producing those lovely pink leaf stalks. Some growers like to exclude light, which encourages the plant to produce tender leaves; this is known in the rhubarb game as ‘blanching’.

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